Disappearing sound on mdv2006
10/01/2018 15:30
Back when it was new I installed mdv2006 on a friend's computer, and it has been running fine ever since. Fine with one exception: sound, which had been working, was lost a couple of days ago.

Running xmms -p from a terminal, both as user and as root, shows: oss_open(): Failed to open audio device (/dev/dsp/): No such file or directory Sure enough, /dev/dsp doesn't exist. And watching the bootup messages scroll by, I see: Loading sound module cmpci: cmpci module not found.

(An aside: this message does not appear in dmesg. I understand the man page to say that dmesg shows all bootup messages, but obviously I am mistaken. Can anyone help me understand what dmesg does and does not show?) locate cmpci as root finds one file, /lib/modules/2.6.17-10mdv/kernel/sound/pci/snd-cmpci.ko.gz, but I'm not sure if this file is useful for my problem.

lspcidrake -v | grep -i audio says snd-cmipci. modprobe.conf has blacklist audio. As implied above, kernel is 2.6.17-10mdv.

Yes, I know mdv2006 is old and no longer receives security updates. Given that it is running on a box that is not connected to the net, and the only user doesn't use removable media, I haven't seen a compelling reason to update.

The box mainly provides background music for a business. No one on site even has the root password, so I do not suspect user error as a cause.

Any thoughts on what I should be looking at to resolve this issue?

Source is Usenet: alt.os.linux.mandriva
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Answer score: 5
10/01/2018 15:30 - I think 2006 is pre udev, so the /dev would still be on the root filesystem.

Regards, Dave Hodgins

Source is Usenet: alt.os.linux.mandriva
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Answer score: 5
10/01/2018 15:30 - On Sunday 10 May 2009 01:50, someone identifying as *David W. Hodgins* wrotein /alt.os.linux.mandriva:/ Nope... :-) /udev/ was first introduced, albeit rudimentary, as of Mandrake10.0 - rudimentary because Mandrake 10.0 came with both a 2.6 and a 2.4kernel, and the system was basically still built against 2.4. /udev/ in10.0 used a separate directory in the root, */udev,* alongside thetraditional on-disk */dev.$ It was more properly set up in 10.1 - using */dev* as the mountpoint - andwas already quite mainstream by 2005 LE, so 2006 would already have had itas well. ;-)

Source is Usenet: alt.os.linux.mandriva
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Answer score: 5
10/01/2018 15:30 - On Saturday 09 May 2009 21:49, someone identifying as *Warren Post* wrotein /alt.os.linux.mandriva:/ /dmesg/ shows the contents of the kernel ring buffer. Right after boot, youshould see the kernel's boot messages in there, but after a while, when thebuffer gets full, these are purged. This is why some distributions createa separate boot log in their /init/ scripts, so as to have /dmesg/ pipe itsoutput to a file right after boot.

That's the kernel module you need allright.

If the device was blacklisted, then its probably because its driver causesproblems in the kernel. However, since the machine is not connected to theinternet - as you describe below - I don't see how the kernel couldpossibly consider the device as blacklisted when it hadn't before. If themachine were connected to the internet, then updated packages would be alikely suspect, but since that is not the case and Linux does not have bitrot, I must suspect some hardware failure, possibly in that sound chip.

Another option would be that the machine has suffered an unclean shutdownand that there is file or filesystem damage. This would not directlyaffect the */dev* filesystem since that lives on /tmpfs/ in Mandriva 2006,but it is possible that the driver file was damaged or that the filesystemis damaged in such a way that the file cannot be loaded into the kernel atboot time. All I know is that things don't suddenly change in aGNU/Linux system without some user intervention or a hardware conditionthat didn't exist before.

Don't be so quick to state that... ;-) Run a /fsck/ and also check on the /modprobe.preload/ thing. Try a Live CDto see if the sound works from there. If it does, then that rules outhardware failure, and then user error is indeed the cause, given that it'san otherwise static system.

Never underestimate the importance of the user. Humans have a way ofscrewing things up. ;-)

Source is Usenet: alt.os.linux.mandriva
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